May 11, 2016

Relate is a little bit different than other online magazines. Sure, we talk about things near and dear to any customer experience leader: customer service, employee engagement, and emerging trends. And we get that things in customer experience are changing. While things have been changing, they are inarguably changing faster than ever before.

But here's where we are different. Instead of chasing the change, we want to know what’s driving the change. What’s behind our need for better customer service skills like empathy and storytelling? What’s pushing our quest for more intuitive and personalized technology? What’s causing the global trends of new business models, the promoter economy, and conscious consumerism?

It’s relationships.

On the surface, business can seem like nothing more than a series of transactions. But underneath it’s really just people–people conversing, people celebrating, and people challenging each other. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. But making it better starts with a simple understanding: Businesses are made of relationships.

And relationships are complicated. Sometimes really complicated.

This is the central theme of Zendesk's new brand messaging. We connected the business side of what Zendesk does—create software for improving customer relationships—to the more general human desire for better relationships.

Relate goes deeper into this universal truth. Online and at our live events, we explore the insights, intrigue, and complexities that exist at the crossroads of personal and professional relationships. If you haven't already noticed, our personal and professional lives are no longer in silos. They are no longer even intertwined; they have collided.

Relate is now made up of three core components—our online magazine, our education and training, and our events. No matter where you go within Relate you’ll find optimism, humility, and a little bit of controversy.

    Watch the live stream of Relate Live San Francisco on May 11th and 12th.

In the latest Fast Company, the editor Robert Safian expresses his dismay with our current presidential candidates—saying that they need to do a better job explaining how their policies would help citizens and companies participate and compete in the global economy of today and tomorrow. Safian implores to them on behalf of his 12-year-old son’s generation, saying, “Let’s give (them) more than rhetoric and nostalgia; let’s give them, a modern reason to cheer.

A modern reason to cheer. That’s what we are doing here. That's what makes us different. Relate is your modern reason to cheer.