We’re moving into an age where job stability is being traded for flexibility and control—without hesitation. While job-hopping is on the rise because of what some may call “selfishness or entitlement,” today’s workforce simply views this shift as choosing personal empowerment over unfounded loyalty to companies that aren’t giving them what they want.

For Millennials, it’s commonplace to change jobs and make a move simply because of irresistible career advancement opportunities.

When asked about his recent career move, Nick Stilwell, a senior account manager at Vevo shares, “When I made the decision to work at Vevo, I was looking at the increasing importance of video for artists to reach fans, and for brands to reach audiences. This signaled the opportunity for growth at the company, and that’s what has been most compelling for me.”

At Stilwell’s previous job, the company’s growth began to flatline, not much had changed in years, and the business was no longer looking as promising as it once was. Any way Stilwell sliced it, he felt a change was in his best interest.

When a company is no longer engaging to employees, a gradual discomfort can permeate employee morale and the overall work environment. Which in turn, makes it more difficult to hold onto key players.

When a company is no longer engaging to employees, a gradual discomfort can permeate employee morale and the overall work environment. Which in turn, makes it more difficult to hold onto key players.

Employers and employees alike are beginning to ask the question, “what makes the perfect workplace

Let’s take a look at the trends that are already beginning to define today's workplace:

It’s clear the companies that are adapting quickly, experimenting, and listening to what their employees are telling them, are pulling ahead in the race to define the future of the modern workplace.

What does the workplace of the future look like?

It’s easy to imagine the bar for company perks, pay, and autonomy continuing to rise for the decades to come, but is that the realistic outcome? It’s hard to tell.

Ten years ago before the iPhone was first released, there was no industry whatsoever for developing iOS apps. Now in 2017, there are more than 2.8 million apps in the Apple app store and 2.2 billion in the Google Play store. This year alone, Apple’s app store revenue is expected to top more than $60 billion.

Naturally, since the rise of the iPhone, there’s been a boom in job growth for mobile app developers—an industry that previously hadn’t existed. If you had the foresight to become an app developer 10 years ago, you would’ve cashed in on an industry with extremely high demand and a low supply of skilled labor. Even today, you can still easily command a six-figure salary as an entry-level iOS app developer at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area.

As a reflection of the growing demand for top technical talent over the past decade, the incentives offered by tech companies who need more employees with these skill sets have risen sharply in comparison to the rest of the labor market.

Companies like Google have become famous for offering perks like gourmet breakfast, lunch, and dinner onsite every day, free transportation to and from work on a wifi connected bus, massage credits, fitness centers, unparalleled benefits, more than four months of maternity leave, a baby bonus to help with the expenses of having a child, free onsite daycare for when you return to work—and even death benefits for the families of Google employees that pass away.

On top of enjoying the obvious perks and incentives, employees at Google also report extremely high levels of happiness with the work they’re doing on a daily basis. They’re frequently challenged, remain engaged, and many say the best part of working there is simply the talented people they get to collaborate with.

While the perks are undoubtedly great at a company like Google, most Millennials show a strong desire for working with other smart, talented, and connected people that’ll bring them opportunities for personal and professional growth.

While the perks are undoubtedly great at a company like Google, most Millennials show a strong desire for working with other smart, talented, and connected people that’ll bring them opportunities for personal and professional growth.

Working with people they enjoy spending time with is a high priority for today's workforce.

Millennials expect freedom and purpose in the workplace

With increasing frequency, Millennials are reporting that more time off and increased freedom in the workplace are more important than a higher salary.

Sure, an extra $5,000 or $10,000 a year in additional income would make a world of difference for most young professionals, but the value of having more time

More than any other generation before us, Millennials crave control over defining our own version of work-life balance that conforms to a number of factors, including where we’re at in our lives, what our personal priorities are, and if our jobs are truly aligned with our current purpose. When any of these criteria aren’t met, you run the risk of alienating Millennial employees that view work very differently than previous generations.

The closer your company is to operating like a true meritocracy that rewards employees for their strong performance, the better.

Hence why the trend of working from home a couple days each week, or even taking on a fully remote position is gaining so much momentum in the startup community—it gives employees the freedom to deliver on their daily objectives, then feel empowered to tend to other areas of their lives.

Here are a few ways you can

  • Fund internal organizations that support causes your employees care about.

  • Provide internal mentorship and career advancement programs.

  • Dedicate time each month to offsite events your employees want to do.

  • Offer unlimited paid time off and incentivize employees to actually use it.

  • Build a flexible remote work policy and an emphasis on meritocracy.

  • Create opportunities for employees to take extended leaves or sabbaticals with a continuation of health benefits.

While it’s a challenge to predict exactly what the future of the workplace is going to look like, one constant will certainly remain a focal point for the years to come—today's workforce craves purpose, freedom, and coworkers they’ll actually enjoy, over just higher salaries and perks like free meals.

If you want to attract (and retain) this generation’s emerging top talent, create a company culture that cares about more than just maximizing profits and efficiency.

Ryan Robinson is an entrepreneur and content marketing consultant to the world’s top experts and growing startups. On his blog, ryrob.com, he teaches over 200,000 monthly readers how to start a profitable side business. Find Ryan on Twitter: @TheRyanRobinson.